Archive: How the false claims of the child abuse industry have harmed america

Those who profit from the Child Abuse Industry must convince both us and their victims that everything is abuse. News media, therapists, prosecutors, judges, lawyers and sex police. Thousands of jobs depend on maximizing claims of abuse.

The Heritage Foundation estimates that welfare costs US taxpayers $360 billion per year, and it is now clear that this underwrites a large portion of the high US divorce rate -- the highest in the world -- and one of the highest illegitimacy rates. The Coalition of Parents estimates that the child abuse industry costs US taxpayers $285 billion per year. This is a case in which the medicine did more damage than the disease -- more children were damaged by their resulting fatherlessness than were protected by these efforts. "Child support" may be only $14 billion per year, but the psychological effects on family dynamics contribute more to family breakup than just the dollar incentives would imply.

Thus about 41% of the $1.6 Trillion national budget is wasted on programs which do little other than to undermine family unity, with terrible consequences. As the following ROFF (Rate of Fatherlessness Factor) suggests, for each $12.5 billion increase in the last 3 decades in the annual expenditure for welfare, the rate of fatherlessness rose 1%, and for each 1% increase in the rate of fatherlessness SAT scores declined 3 points, and the prison population increased by 41,296 inmates.

It seems that the cure is worse than the disease.

What you don't know about foster care

According to a 2011 AFCARS (the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System) “Yearly, referrals to state child protective services involve 6.3 million children and approximately 3 million of those children are subject to an investigated report.”

According to this report, in 2012, CPS took an estimated 650,000 to one million children from their homes, playground hospitals and parents. The same report suggests that only 6 percent or less (39,000 out of the 650,000 to million) were in any real danger or “high-risk” environments.

The more children in foster care, the more money a local CPS agency receives from the federal government, with the funds distributed throughout the community. Funding recipients include: teachers, attorneys, doctors, judges, therapists, caseworkers, foster parents, coaches, sub-agencies such as Family First and Head Start, insurance companies, consultants, outside contractors, and watchdog agencies, to name but a few. There is a profound conflict of interest between those in an authoritative position to protect children (CPS caseworkers and the earlier named affiliates) and the fact that those same people (and their associates) can financially benefit from the act of placing children in foster care.

Ninety-six percent of foster parents are on disability, unemployment, or workers’ comp, or have low-income jobs, resulting in children getting placed with unqualified, and often times, abusive recipients. Many foster parents are emotionally unstable or mentally incompetent, and a large majority have criminal records. Ninety-three percent of foster parents use the system for perverted and/or financial gain, using children as currency, to pay rent, place food on the table, pay the cable bill, etc. These financial incentives have led to unintended consequences, attracting pedophiles, predators, drug addicts, and sadists.

The National Child Abuse & Neglect Data System (NCANDS) reported that, in 2012, 1,545 U.S. children died from child abuse. For many years, the Children’s Bureau (a department within DHS/CPS) reported 1,000 deaths a year within the CPS system. The Children’s Bureau also rounds off to the nearest thousand – so if the real tally of children dying in state custody is 1,499, only 1,000 will be reported.

Shockingly, this leaves only 46 children, nationwide, killed outside of Child Protective Services, a government program designed to protect children.